Quartz vs. Granite Composite: What To Choose

Quartz vs. Granite Composite: What To Choose

Decisions, decisions… Choosing between quartz and granite composite for a countertop is one of the toughest things to do when you’re building or remodeling. Counters are permanent features that you can’t swap out weekly. Understanding the differences between the two materials will help you when you’re trying to decide.

What Is Quartz?

True quartz is a mineral found all over the earth’s surface. In terms of countertops or sinks, quartz is often a composite of around 70 to 80% quartz particles and 20 to 30% resin. This makes quartz counters beautiful options that will work hard for you in your kitchen or bathroom. The look is one of real stone, with the resilience of resin.

What Is Granite Composite?

Not to be confused with true granite, granite composite is similar to quartz in that it’s comprised of mostly granite (about 90 to 95%) with a small percentage of resin. Resin is nonporous, which is why it’s the perfect substance to mix with beautiful stone.

Compared to regular granite, granite composite is more chip- and scratch-resistant, and it doesn’t have to be sealed regularly like 100% granite does. Granite composite is still plenty heavy with so much stone in it.

How To Choose

Now for the tough part—how do you choose? Style and color options, along with price and wear and tear, need to be part of the decision-making process when you’re choosing between quartz and granite composite. Quartz tends to be more affordable, and it comes in a vast array of color choices because it’s basically a manmade product. Granite composite, on the other hand, although a little pricier, is indestructible as a countertop or sink because a large percent of the product is actual stone from the earth’s crust. However, because it’s such a hard surface, it will show no mercy should you drop a dish on it.

Both materials are beautiful, and both will get the job done. Gannage Design & Construction, home remodelers in Atascadero, CA, and the surrounding areas, is here to help with decisions such as which materials to use for your countertops as well as with all your home remodeling needs.